There is evidence that a vaping additive is behind lung illness




Just this 2019, we’ve read reports that vaping has sent a lot of people to the hospital, but a lot of people have argued that vaping can’t be the reason why those people were bedridden.

Just this 2019, we’ve read reports that vaping has sent a lot of people to the hospital, but a lot of people have argued that vaping can’t be the reason why those people were bedridden.

 

Researchers have found an additive called vitamin E acetate in samples tested this year. It has been discovered that a chemical called vitamin E acetate is playing a huge role in the recent vaping outbreak that has sent a lot of Americans to the hospital.

 

Just 26th November this year, researchers at the Minnesota Department of Health released the results of the study in which they analyzed twenty vaping products seized from black-market manufacturers during the lung illness outbreak this year.

 

Before the 2019 lung illness outbreak, 10 products were seized in 2018. Researchers found vitamin E acetate in all samples they tested from 2019, but not in samples tested in 2018.

 

According to the authors of this finding, as published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, which is a journal from CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), “vitamin E acetate might have been introduced recently as filler or diluents.”

 

The research results

Vitamin E acetate is an oil derived from Vitamin E. So black-market vaping manufacturers sometimes add it to vaping products that contain THC (the active ingredient in marijuana) to dilute or cut the THC.

 

Earlier in November, health officials said vitamin E acetate is a very strong culprit of concern in the vaping outbreak, after finding it in the lung samples taken from patients with vaping-related lung illness (aka EVALI).

 

Also, researchers in the new study analyzed vaping products obtained from 12 patients with EVALI in Minnesota. They analyzed 46 samples and found that over half (52 percent) contain vitamin E acetate.

 

Out of 12 patients who submitted the samples, 11 of them were found to have used products containing vitamin E acetate. This chemical was specifically found in THC-containing products but not in the products containing only nicotine.

 

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The author says, “The findings support the potential role of vitamin E acetate in the EVALI outbreak.

 

But the researchers stress that their study only found association and can’t prove that vitamin E acetate causes lung injury. Researchers also say, there may be more than one ingredient or chemical involved in the outbreak.

 

In addition, the authors note that large studies are needed to finally confirm that vitamin E acetate is a newly introduced substance.

 

The bottom line

The authors concluded, “Vitamin E acetate should not be added to vaping or e-cigarette products until the relationship between lung health and vitamin E acetate is better characterized.” CDC recommends that people don’t use THC-containing e-cigarette products, especially from informal sources like online dealers, family or friends.

 

As of 20th November 2019, over 2,200 Americans have developed lung illnesses in connection to vaping, according to the CDC.

 

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